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Showing posts with label Phenomena. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Phenomena. Show all posts

Phenomena

This is a partial list of social and cultural phenomena specific to the Internet, such as popular themes, catchphrases, images, viral videos, jokes, and more. When such fads and sensations occur online, they tend to grow rapidly and become more widespread because the instant communication facilitates word of mouth. Contents [hide] 1 Advertising 2 Animation and comics 3 Email 4 Film 5 Gaming 6 Images 7 Music 8 Videos 9 Other phenomena 10 See also 11 References 12 External links Advertising The Shake Weight Blendtec – The blender product, claimed by its creator Tom Dickson to be the most powerful blender, is featured in a series of YouTube videos, "Will It Blend?" where numerous food and non-food items are used within the blender.[1] Cooks Source infringement controversy – An advertising-supported publication's dismissive response to copyright infringement complaint causes online backlash.[2] Elf Yourself (2006) and its related Scrooge Yourself (2007) are both interactive websites created by Jason Zada and Evolution Bureau for OfficeMax's holiday season advertising campaign. Elf Yourself allows visitors to upload images of themselves or their friends, see them as dancing elves,[3][4] and includes options to post the created video to other sites or save it as a personalized mini-film.[5] According to ClickZ, visiting the Elf Yourself site "has become an annual tradition that people look forward to".[6] While not selling any one specific product, the two were created to raise consumer awareness of the sponsoring firm.[7] Embrace Life – A public service announcement for seatbelt advocacy made for a local area of the United Kingdom that achieved a million hits on its first two weeks on YouTube in 2010.[8][9] FreeCreditReport.com – A series of TV commercials that were posted on the Internet; many spoofs of the commercials were made and posted on YouTube.[10] HeadOn – A June 2006 advertisement for a homeopathic product claimed to relieve headaches. Ads featured the tagline, "HeadOn. Apply directly to the forehead", stated three times in succession, accompanied by a video of a model using the product without ever directly stating the product's